Amazon gift card scam: Con artists tricking Christmas shoppers into paying for fake goods

Amazon customers are being urged to keep their wits about them in the run-up to the festive season following reports of a new scam targeting shoppers. Fraudsters have been tricking Amazon customers into purchasing Amazon gift cards and then sending the codes as “payment” for goods that never turn up. Amazon, meanwhile, appears unable to step in on the issue.

Customers have been tricked into buying high-value gift cards and sending the codes to scammers.

Source: Amazon gift card scam: Con artists tricking Christmas shoppers into paying for fake goods

Stick To Trusted Brands & Sites This #BlackFriday & #CyberMonday – Safe In Warwickshire

The big names in retail go to great lengths to secure their sites or mobile apps. Just be sure to always double check that the name is spelled right in the URL (so “amazon.com” not “amaz0n.com”) – small differences like the number 0, instead of the letter o could be the only difference.

It’s also important that the app comes from an official corporate site or an app store and is clearly labelled, and that the logo and colours match the brand.

If you plan to stick with browsers, look for the “S” at the end of HTTP in the address bar of your browser. (It sometimes appears only after you’ve logged in or clicked to the shopping basket.) If the “S” is not there, play it safe shop somewhere else.

Source: Stick To Trusted Brands & Sites This #BlackFriday & #CyberMonday – Safe In Warwickshire

Warwickshire Police – Online shopping?

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The internet is a fantastic resource for people searching for that special something for friends, family and loved ones in the run up to Christmas but it also presents opportunities for fraudsters to set up scams.

Source: Warwickshire Police – Online shopping?

Fake ISP “Spam Mailout” Notifications Contain Locky Ransomware

Email purporting to be from “ISP Support” claims that your ISP has received spam mailouts from your address recently and urges you to open an attached file to view a log of the supposed.

The email is not a genuine notification from your Internet Service Provider and the attached .zip file does not contain a log of spam messages as claimed. Instead, the attachment contains a malicious JavaScript file that, if opened, can download and install Locky ransomware on your computer.

Source: Fake ISP “Spam Mailout” Notifications Contain Locky Ransomware

Cyber Threats You Should Watch Out For This Year – All Technology Feeds – Medium

“Every minute, we are seeing about half a million attack attempts that are happening in cyberspace.” -Derek Manky, Fortinet global security strategist.

Such is the extent of cyber crimes and security threats in the world today… machine to machine attacks, headless worms etc is the kind of vocabulary used in the cyber-security language. This kind of vocabulary manages to incite the level of fear that is ought to be appropriate, considering all we have is at stake.

Source: Cyber Threats You Should Watch Out For This Year – All Technology Feeds

Stranded Traveller Scams – Hoax-Slayer 2G

Email that was supposedly sent by a friend claims that he or she is stranded without money or papers in a foreign land because of a robbery. The email, which comes from your friend’s real email account, asks if you can send funds urgently to help the stranded friend return home.

Source: Stranded Traveller Scams – Hoax-Slayer 2G

#Amazon #Phishing Emails Targeting #BlackFriday Customers – Safe In Warwickshire

Scammers are playing on Amazon’s early Black Friday sales by sending out emails purportedly from the company saying there is a problem processing orders and that they won’t be shipped. …

Source: #Amazon #Phishing Emails Targeting #BlackFriday Customers – Safe In Warwickshire

Twitter users warned of phishing scam hiding in plain sight as Promoted Tweet

Crooks ask for payment details in return for a blue tick

Twitter users have been warned of a Promoted Tweet appearing in feeds that offers to help them get their account verified, but is actually a phishing scam hiding in plain sight.

The message, which could appear in users’ feeds regardless of who they follow, contains a link to a site that requests account information, and more worryingly payment details, in return for helping to place a blue tick on user profiles.

 However, as security firm Malwarebytes noted, the entire set-up is a ruse which has so far ensnared almost 1,000 people.

Source: Twitter users warned of phishing scam hiding in plain sight as Promoted Tweet