Ghost broker scam: Police warn thousands of motorists may have fake car insurance

Men in their 20s are most likely to be targeted by ‘ghost brokers’ who often contact victims on Facebook or Instagram.

Thousands of motorists may be victims of 'ghost brokers'

Thousands of motorists could be unwittingly driving without insurance because of fraudsters known as “ghost brokers” selling fake policies, police have warned.

Detectives received more than 850 reports of the scam in the last three years, with victims losing an estimated total of £631,000, according to City of London officers. But the force said the actual number of victims could be much higher as drivers are often unaware their policy is invalid.

Tactics used by “ghost brokers” include taking out a genuine insurance policy before quickly cancelling it and claiming the refund plus the victim’s money. They also forge insurance documents or falsify a driver’s details to bring the price down, police said.

Men aged in their 20s are most likely to be targeted, with “ghost brokers” often contacting victims on social media including Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp.

WhatsApp and Facebook messenger icons are seen on an iPhone

They also advertise on student websites or money-saving forums, university notice boards and marketplace websites and may sell insurance policies in pubs, clubs or bars, newsagents and car repair shops.

A national campaign has now been launched to warn drivers to be wary of heavily discounted policies on the internet or cheap insurance prices they are offered directly. Some victims only realise they do not have genuine cover when they are stopped by police or try to make an insurance claim after an accident, detectives said.

Police have taken action in 417 cases linked to “ghost broking” in the last three years, including one man who set up 133 fake policies and another man who earned £59,000 from the scam.

Drivers without valid car insurance are breaking the law and face punishments including fines, points on their driving licence and having their vehicles seized.

Source: Ghost broker scam: Police warn thousands of motorists may have fake car insurance

DHL Express ‘Parcel Arrival Notification’ Malware Email

Parcel Delivery Malware Email

This email, which purports to be from DHL Express,  is supposedly a pre-arrival notification for a parcel that has been delivered to your local post office. The email instructs you to click a link to download and print a receipt that you can submit when picking up the parcel. However, the email is not from DHL and clicking the link does not download a parcel delivery receipt. Instead, the link opens a website that harbours malware. Once on the bogus website, you will be instructed to click a “download” button. If you do so, malware may be delivered to your computer. The exact nature of this malware may vary.

This type of attack is often used to distribute ransomware.  Once installed, ransomware can lock all the files on your computer and then demand that you pay a fee to online criminals to receive an unlock code. In other cases, the malware may be designed to steal sensitive information such as banking passwords from the infected computer. In recent years, fake parcel delivery notification emails have been repeatedly used by criminals to distribute various types of malware. Be cautious of any email that claims that you must click a link or open an attached file to view details about a supposed parcel delivery.

An example of the malware email:

From: DHL EXPRESS
Subject: Parcel arrival notification 
Hi [email address],
This is a pre-arrival notification of your parcel to our local post office
Kindly Print/Download your DHL-AWD reciept to be submitted during pick-up.
Print/Download DHL-AWD reciept here
Kindly endeavour to be accurate as possible to reduce time of clearance and recipient confirmation.
Please add our email to your contact to guarantee inbox delivery. | 2018 DHL Express | Customer Service |

The people behind the tech support scams – Which? News

 ‘Do you see a Windows key on the bottom-left of your keyboard?’ a deep male voice asked me on the phone. I said yes. Over the next two minutes, the man instructed me to enter a series of commands, until my computer’s home screen erupted into a cascade of warnings and errors.
Fortunately, this was a secure demonstration, and my computer was at no real risk. I had challenged Shantanu Banerjee to conjure up warning signs of viruses on my perfectly healthy computer. He was more than happy to oblige. Until 2015, making up computer viruses out of thin air is what Banerjee, a 25-year-old from Kolkata, did for a living. ‘See what I did there? There is no problem on your computer. Your computer is fit and fine. But my job is to convince you that it has many problems.’
Criminal underworld
In January 2014, Banerjee started his career as a tech support scammer in one of Kolkata’s ‘hundreds of outfits.’ He would still be cheating victims across the UK out of thousands of pounds to this day, if his company hadn’t withheld his month’s salary of £290. Unlike most of his colleagues, who simply left the company when that happened, Banerjee kept demanding his pending wages. That’s when the truly immoral nature of his criminal employers was revealed.
On 3 December 2014, he posted a message on Facebook: ‘I protest [about my salary], but they keep me [hostage] whole night and beat me. Police also not help me, so I am very alone…please help me.’ Once a scammer himself, now seeking help against criminals, Banerjee posted the name and address of the company that he had worked for.
This April, when I reached out to him after reading the post, Banerjee was so disillusioned with his former career that he offered to send me ‘a list of every company in Kolkata who is running a tech support scam.’
 
 India-wide problem
India has made a name for itself as the home of the tech support scam. Over two-thirds of Microsoft’s customers in the UK have encountered such scams, according to a 2016 Microsoft report. A 2016 study by New York’s Stony Brook University found that 86% of all tech scams worldwide originated in India. According to Microsoft research, the average loss suffered by victims is £600. Older consumers tend to be at greater risk of falling for the scam – the average age of victims is 62.
In 2012, the US Federal Trade Commission shut down six Indian tech support companies which had conned people across the US, UK, Australia and Canada, raking in millions of pounds since 2008. Half of them had been operating from Banerjee’s own city of Kolkata. Banerjee was far from alone in wanting to denounce his former employers. Since February 2017, when I began researching such scams for The Hindustan Times, dozens of current and former scammers across India have revealed the names and details of their companies to me. ‘These days, in Dehradun, there are many tech support scams going on. I know all the places in Dehradun,’ one such whistleblower told me. ‘I’ve worked for Live Technician in Jaipur, and the same company operates from Noida, Mohali and Dehradun,’ emailed another. ‘Everywhere I went, I found these types companies, from Gurgaon to Noida and Delhi,’ one contact – who’d spent years in the industry – told me. ‘Every second company in Noida is running a tech support scam,’ confirmed another former call centre worker.
Tech Support Scam Agents
Who are the scam callers? India’s tech support scammers are drawn from its vast pool of English-speaking and computer-savvy youth. Lacking conventional employment, they find themselves plying this dubious trade. The numbers are compelling. Of India’s population of 1.3bn, a third are aged 35 or below. The economy may be growing at 7% a year, but jobs can still be scarce. A million Indians enter the job market every month, but only a tiny fraction find formal employment. That’s why many get sucked into India’s ever-expanding economy of fraud. Huge amounts of money are assured, but the true working conditions prove to be far from rosy.
Every tech support scammer I spoke to had followed a similar pattern. Fresh out of college, they placed their CVs on popular job websites and were contacted by ‘placement agents’ who directed them, for a commission, to obscure technology companies conducting murky business.
Lure of the money
The promise of lucrative incentives tempted many of the people we spoke to. The job-seekers were immediately hired at a respectable entry-level of salary of £250-£350 per month. Some cited commissions of Rs 1,000 (£12) for every £1,000 they earned their company.
‘A genuine job won’t even pay you a monthly salary of Rs 10,000 (£116), said Gaurav Dalmiya, who worked at Live Technician in Noida, a suburb of Delhi. ‘Freshers are hired immediately, if they speak good English. They soon become addicted to easy money,’ said Sanjit Sohni, who also worked at Live Technician, but in the north Indian city of Jaipur.
Only on their first day of training would they learn that their job was to scare foreign computer owners into buying worthless security services. At their training, new recruits are brought up to speed quickly on how to pull off the scam. They are handed a script and made to listen to recorded calls, to help understand the accents of potential victims. ‘In 10 days, I learned everything. Then, for the next 10 days, I rehearsed the script with my more experienced colleagues,’ said Dalmiya. He estimates at least 50 tech support scam centres to be running in Noida’s corporate network.
Tech Support Scam Victim 
Some of the support scammers I spoke to told me that, initially, they’d worried no one would believe the lies they were expected to peddle to overseas victims. ‘If there is a problem in your computer, how would I know about it? Why am I calling you from Microsoft? Microsoft is a computer manufacturer, it doesn’t make calls to its customers about viruses,’ Shantanu Banerjee remembers, thinking back to his first day on the job. But their confidence in the method was revived every time a victim fell for it. ‘If it’s an older customer, then there’s a 90% chance of a sale. If it’s a UK customer, then 100%,’ said Dalmiya, who told me he had to scam at least 10 people a day to meet his $5,000 monthly target for the company. The closer they get to the psyche of their potential victims, the easier their job. Callers have to adapt to regional differences, too. ‘Unlike US customers, those in the UK don’t care for friendly small talk. All they want is for your English to be perfect. You show some respect, you tell them they need to upgrade their firewall, and they will say, “go for it”, and you are in,’ says Dalmiya. ‘UK customers are usually very rich. Old ladies start crying the moment you tell them that there’s a problem with their computer, so you have to proceed delicately,’ according to Aman Sivaram. ‘Most people who get pop-ups are doing something wrong – eg porn. So, we show the customer his browsing history, tell him that his computer is full of problems, and offer to clean it for $500,’ Sivaram says.
Advanced deception
Once they know how to pull off the basic script, the scammers feel ready for all kinds of deception. ‘I used to tell people that their emails were hacked by someone in Russia,’ said Gaurav Dalmiya. Another former technician, Ramesh Pandey, told me he dealt with people needing help after forgetting their Facebook logins. ‘A representative [pretends] he is a Facebook expert and would help the customer, and, in order to do so, he would need to take remote access. Once he gets that, he goes ahead and runs a diagnosis.
Then, the scare tactics start. If the customer refuses to pay, even the FBI is mentioned.’ Big money at the top ‘They said they will kidnap me if I asked them for my salary.’
The support technicians make good money by Indian standards. But, it’s their bosses who are truly raking in the cash. The scammers I spoke to seemed staggered by the amount of money the call centres can make. Some scammers estimated the average monthly haul to be anywhere from £4,000 to £15,000. Others believed it was even more. ‘Just by conning gullible US or UK customers, the company averages $1,000-$1,200 on an OK day, and up to $20,000 on a good day,’ said Pandey.
At some point, though, they realise that no matter how well they know the tricks of the trade, they are unable to meet their company’s escalating sales targets. ‘They have a revenue expectation for every call, and each is reviewed against that expectation,’ says Aman Sivaram. The companies may pay Rs 300-400 (around £4) for every scare-mongering pop-up they place on websites, and they push staff hard to recover such costs. Bullying tactics against staff appear rife in the industry. Incentives are held up, salaries delayed, and punishments meted out – a trend I gathered from story after story that the scammers told me. ‘If you failed to achieve even a single sale, they would extend your shift by two hours. Total slavery. Or, they would make people stand up and raise their hands,’ one call handler told me. ‘They tell you that you can’t go home even after your shift if you haven’t made three sales of $99 each,’ said another. In a darker example, one source told me that, ‘They said they will kidnap me if I asked them for my [pending] salary.’
Luxury for the masterminds
The founders of these companies come across as elusive figures who cultivate an aura of grandeur among their staff. ‘These people have a lot of money, they have contacts in high places, and they have arrangements with the police,’ Shantanu Banerjee told me. Most office-level scammers never get to meet their ultimate bosses. But, they are in awe of the lifestyle the self-professed ‘entrepreneurs’ flash in their Facebook photographs: luxury cars, late-night parties, exotic holidays, beautiful women. Between begging for their own salaries and craving the good life seen in these photos, many scammers realise that, like their victims, they, too, have been fed lies.
Guilty conscience
Some leave the profession with regrets about their past actions, and the victims they left in their wake. ‘What we did was wrong, because the software we sold people is freely available on the internet from Microsoft and others,’ said Aman Sivaram, a former support caller. ‘I am still unemployed, but would rather remain this way than to barter my integrity,’ Ramesh Pandey told me.
Others show no such signs of remorse, and leave the companies to launch their own scam outfits. Anshul Garg tells me he slaved at several call centres before joining a group of disgruntled employees to start their own tech support scam. It doesn’t take much to run a tech support scam, after all: a few tech-savvy people, a rented room, some phones, computers with basic software, and an international bank account.
While these scams remain such a thriving industry in India, consumers in the UK will be at risk. It’s more important than ever to be vigilant to such threats. The names in this report have been changed to protect the identities of those who have helped with this investigation.
Live Technician
A number of sources told us that they had previously worked for a company called Live Technician. We asked Samay Vashisth, CEO of Live Technician, to explain the conduct of his business, in light of the allegations made by its former staff, and following our own calls to its agents. No reports of physical threats had been made to us by any former Live Technician staff, but Vashisth confirmed that many staff salaries had gone unpaid. Vashisth denied his company made fraud support calls. ‘We do genuine business where people search for problems and call us and we sell our packages to them,’ Vashisth told us. ‘Then, we provide genuine service year after year.’ Vashisth said the tech support side of his business had been largely closed down, and it no longer dealt with UK customers.
We explained that we had recently called Live Technician, posing as a UK customer, and had been pushed pricey four-year support. His biography on the company website sits below effusive descriptions of how it provides ‘world-class technical assistance to consumers’. ‘We have a quality control team and we don’t sell anything forcefully,’ he told us. ‘A few agents may do this to get higher incentives, but they get punished if we find anyone doing this.’

We are the Cyber Champions

The certification of 21 new Cyber Champions has followed an event staged by Nuneaton & Bedworth Neighbourhood Watch Association (N&BNWA). All are active volunteers in their own localities serving their neighbours by helping protect them from harm.

When it first started in 982 its focus was very much on enabling neighbours, by banding together and working closely with their local police, to protect themselves from the impact of threats such as burglary, criminal damage and vehicle crimes. How things have changed! Although those original threats have not gone away the greatest current threat is cybercrime.

Responding to this developing threat began in earnest by N&BNWA followed a challenge issued at its 2015 AGM by then Deputy Police & Crime Commissioner Dr Eric Wood – “…… and what are you going to do about it?” We began by making use of DISC (Database & Intranet for Safer Communities) to improve the efficacy of our communication network.

This was followed in 2016 by the organisation, in conjunction with NW colleagues from across Warwickshire, of a Combating Cybercrime Conference. Its aim was that each of the five district NW associations would be able to develop and implement and effective action plan.

By early 2017 N&BNWA had developed and adopted a Combating Cybercrime Policy supported by an operable, rolling action plan. Alert messages and advisory cybersecurity information items are posted regularly on DISC, on Twitter @NunBed and on website www.nbnwa.net Very recently the launch of a Nuneaton wide network of interlinked, closed Facebook groups has considerable enhanced capability to successfully deliver the Combating Cybercrime Action Plan.

And following the Community Champion’s event, so excellently facilitated by Warwickshire County Council Cybercrime Advisor Sam Slemensk, N&BNWA now has a cadre of up-skilled volunteers to support the delivery of the action plan

Beware of “Rbauxx” – it is a Fake RayBan Sunglass Selling Website

Beware of "Rbauxx" - it is a Fake RayBan Sunglass Selling Website

The website “www.rbauxx.com” is another untrustworthy online store claiming to sell RayBan sunglasses/eyeglasses, which online users are advised to stay away from. Persons who shop on the untrustworthy website run the risk of their personal, credit card and other payment processing information getting stolen by cyber-criminals and used fraudulently. They also run the risk of receiving counterfeit goods. Therefore, we do not recommend purchasing or visiting the website “www.rbauxx.com”. Persons who have already used their credit cards on the fraudulent website should contact their banks or credit card company immediately for help.

RayBan Sunglasse at www.rbauxx.com

Rayban Store – Discount Rayban Sunglasses $19.99. Just Today Free Shipping And Free Returns Order Over 3 Piece.

The cybercriminals behind the fake website will use another website and change the name, once the current website has been taken down. So, look out for similar fake RayBan Sunglass selling websites.

Please share with us what you know or ask a question about this article by leaving a comment below. Also, check the comment section below for additional information, if there is any.

Remember to forward malicious or phishing email messages to us at the following email address: info@onlinethreatalerts.com

Source: Beware of “Rbauxx” – it is a Fake RayBan Sunglass Selling Website

Cybercrime: £130bn stolen from consumers in 2017, report says

More than a quarter of cybercrime victims believe they are safe from future attacks.

Of the 978m global victims of cybercrime last year, 17m were Britons targeted by phishing, ransomware, online fraud and hacking. Hackers stole a total of £130bn from consumers in 2017, including £4.6bn from British internet users, according to a new report from cybersecurity firm Norton. More than 17 million Brits were hit by cybercrime in the past year, meaning the nation, which accounts for less than 1% of the global population, makes up almost 2% of the 978 million global victims of cybercrime and almost 4% of the global losses. The losses were more than just financial. Each victim of cybercrime spent, on average, nearly two working days dealing with the aftermath of the attack.

But Norton warns that cybercrime victims are not doing enough to protect themselves online. The report found that they are more than twice as likely as those who haven’t fallen prey to cybercrime to share passwords to online accounts with other people, and almost twice as likely to use the same password for all online accounts. What’s more, a surprising number of cybercrime victims – more than a quarter – believe they are safe from future attacks.

“Consumers’ actions revealed a dangerous disconnect: despite a steady stream of cybercrime sprees reported by media, too many people appear to feel invincible and skip taking even basic precautions to protect themselves,” said Nick Shaw, Norton’s general manager for EMEA. “This disconnect highlights the need for consumer digital safety and the urgency for consumers to get back to basics when it comes to doing their part to prevent cybercrime.”

The head of the UK’s National Cybersecurity Centre warned on Tuesday that it was a matter of “when, not if” Britain would be hit by a major cyber-attack, capable of disrupting critical infrastructure or the democratic process. “Some attacks will get through. What you need to do [at that point] is cauterise the damage,” Ciaran Martin said.

WhatsApp group chats not as secure as users might believe

Researchers have discovered flaws in the way WhatsApp,is messaging app handle secure (encrypted) group communication,which could result in unauthorized users getting added to closed groups and monitoring future conversations within them.

The problem with WhatsApp:
Paul Rösler, Christian Mainka, and Jörg Schwenk analysed the three widely used protocols and their implementations, and found that if someone – e.g., nation-state backed hackers (illegally), or law enforcement or intelligence agencies (legally) – gains control of WhatsApp’s servers, they could easily insert a new member in a private group without the permission of the group’s administrator(s).

The other participants will get a notification about a new user joining the group, but they have no way of knowing whether the new member was invited by the administrator(s). Also, if the attacker controls the server, he or she can block the messages sent by users who might question the new addition or warn others about it.

As noted cryptographer and Johns Hopkins University professor Matthew Green explained, the vulnerability stems from the fact that the WhatsApp server plays a significant role in group management, and that group management messages are not end-to-end encrypted or signed.

“When an administrator wishes to add a member to a group, it sends a message to the server identifying the group and the member to add. The server then checks that the user is authorized to administer that group, and (if so), it sends a message to every member of the group indicating that they should add that user. The flaw here is obvious: since the group management messages are not signed by the administrator, a malicious WhatsApp server can add any user it wants into the group. This means the privacy of your end-to-end encrypted group chat is only guaranteed if you actually trust the WhatsApp server.”

What now?
The main problem is this: end-to-end encryption, which WhatsApp purports to offer, should not depend on uncompromised servers. “We haven’t entirely achieved this yet, thanks to things like key servers. But we are making progress. This bug is a step back, and it’s one a sophisticated attacker potentially could exploit,” Green noted.

The researchers disclosed their findings to WatsApp last summer. WhatsApp said that the “group invitation bug” is a theoretical danger that’s additionally minimized by the fact that users will receive a notification about a new user joining the group. Also, the spokesperson noted, administrators could warn users about the new, unauthorized addition via private messages. That seems to be enough for them at the moment, especially because a fix for the flaw could end up breaking the convenient “group invite link” feature.

There are apps for most things; use them safely and securely

Thanks to apps, your phone, tablet and maybe your smart watch have become the smartest and fastest way to communicate, navigate, shop, bank, book, pay, get your entertainment … and much more. But convenience can be accompanied by disadvantages, so we’d like to pass on a few expert tips about making sure you choose and use apps safely and securely.

Use only official app stores

Avoid downloading fraudulent or otherwise illegitimate apps by using only the official store for your device’s operating system, and avoiding unauthorised sources such as bulletin boards and peer-to-peer networks. Even then, read reviews and choose with care, as some rogue apps occasionally make their way into app stores.

Read the small print

When downloading apps, you’re usually asked to agree to terms and conditions. These can be quite lengthy and complex, but it’s important to do so as some small print includes details on data sharing, in-app payments and other conditions.

Know what permissions you’re granting

You may be asked for permission for an app to access your location, photos, camera, contacts or other functions or data. Before agreeing, think about if you really want this type of access enabled, and the safety aspects of others knowing what you’re doing and where you are (especially important for children).

Check settings

Where possible, check app settings to determine whether downloading updates and day-to-day data are enabled automatically. This may be convenient, but it could also make it easier for your data to be intercepted, and may use up your data allowance.

Check content ratings

Most apps found in the official app stores feature ratings with guidance on the content and intensity of various aspects of the app. Each store has its own policy, so ratings may vary from store to store. A nice-to-have for you, but essential for apps which may be accessed by children.

Use public Wi-Fi safely

When you’re out and about, remember that you shouldn’t use Wi-Fi hotspots for confidential communications or transactions in places like cafés, pubs and hotel rooms, as there’s no guarantee of security. Instead, use your data, or wait until you get back to your secure Wi-Fi.

Always log out

When you’ve finished using an app – particularly one for banking, shopping or payments – always log out, as simply closing the app may not necessarily do it for you. This also goes for location-based apps, when you want to keep your whereabouts to yourself.

Download updates

Always download app updates when prompted, because as well as providing new features and better functionality, updates usually contain at least one security fix.

Look after your devices

With today’s apps, your mobile device becomes a computer, wallet, satnav, photo album, TV, filing cabinet, and much more. You shouldn’t leave any of these items in an unlocked house or vehicle, or unattended in a café or on a train …your mobile device is no different. And always PIN or password-protect your device as a first line of security.

Keep an eye on those bills

Be aware of the data used by apps when you’re out and about, including roaming charges abroad. And remember that some apps enable in-app purchases, which can be very attractive to use – especially to children – but at a price.

Do your housekeeping

Filling your phone or tablet with dozens of apps you don’t use can affect its performance, including reducing battery life. Remove the ones you haven’t used for a while, apart from security apps. If you’re disposing of your phone by any means, erase all data and apps, also preferably doing a factory re-set.

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Cyber-threats in university Clearing and how to overcome them -it Security Guru

A Level results are out.  For many, this is a time of celebration as they take up offers for the university or college of their choice.  However, for those who have not received the results they need it can be a stressful time as they enter Clearing, and turn to online search to secure a university or college place to continue their studies.

Cybercriminals are wise to this forthcoming uptick in web traffic, and have been creating higher education phishing sites to trick stressed students into clicking on malware-laden links.  This is not a new scam, and is evidence that cybercriminals are diversifying to rework banking, online shopping and other phishing scams.  Today security researchers at Forcepoint are now warning prospective students across the UK and internationally to beware of these scams.

Carl Leonard, principal security analyst at Forcepoint said: “This activity could come from one-off individual criminal elements speculating for financial gain or as part of an organised gang spreading malware kits or adding to botnets.  Using search analytics criminals can map likely human reactions and rework tried and tested social engineering scams to target vulnerable individuals.  Broadly, if a university or college offer appears too good to be true, it probably is.”

“University students will continue to be targeted by cyber criminals at relevant times of the year.  The scammers will continue to setup fraudulent websites and send convincing emails demanding interaction in order to manipulate a student’s behaviour when they are under the most time pressure.”

As a way of preventing these cyber scams, Forcepoint advises students searching for university and college courses for the autumn to do the following:

  • Type in the URL rather than clicking on links in email or in online adverts
  • Use reputable search engines
  • Be aware of lure lines such as “discounted course fees,” “multiple course places available now,” or the usage of highly respected educational establishment names in promotions
  • Keep internet security up to date on PCs and mobiles
  • Begin your Clearing search via the UCAS website, which contains official links and the latest up-to-date places
  • Reach out to the university or colleges admin secretary office if you have doubts as to the legitimacy of a fee or offer

Wayne Gaish, IT Strategic Development Manager, Petroc said: “Petroc takes cyber security very seriously and in particular for our learners at this crucial time of year. The guidance provided by Forcepoint will help promote a better understanding for our learners in today’s digital world.”

Frank Jeffs, post-graduate researcher and former Head of Advertising at Middlesex University said:

“Scams of this nature have the potential to trick stressed UK-based students, but could also catch out international students who are seeking courses in the UK.  In my experience, scammers use well-known university names such as Oxford or Cambridge and create fake institutions which sound very similar.  Designed to look realistic and offering qualifications at a low price or attempting to capture personal information, this social engineering trick could easily catch out international studients or people who might not have the local knowledge of the official educational establishment names.  Always go via the UCAS website or type in the URL of the university or college you are interested in.”

 

Stop children bingeing on social media during holidays, parents urged | Society | The Guardian

Children’s commissioner says too much time is spent online as she launches ‘five a day’ campaign. Children’s access to Snapchat should be limited, the children’s commissioner says. Photograph: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters.

Source: Stop children bingeing on social media during holidays, parents urged | Society | The Guardian